Saturday, March 12, 2011

Remembering those in Japan and Christ Church, NZ

It is sometimes easy to forget the disasters befalling our fellow human beings. In what might be a form of compassion fatigue I find myself trying to tune out what I learn in the news. Our news tells us of wars, starvation, disease, and environmental tragedy around the world daily/ hourly - and possibly in an effort to keep going  I for one try to focus on my own small part of the world, perhaps hoping by staying positive I can somehow make a difference to the people in my life at least.And working with children, there is always the pull to the present, to life, and small joys.

But this evening I know I would like to take time to reflect on the experience of the people in Japan.In respect for their tragedy I want to hold them in my thoughts, not letting anything else intrude.  

7 comments:

Geraldine said...

It's hard to imagine what it would be like to be in Japan right now. I've been thinking about the plight of all the people there too. The images are so hard to look at. We can only hope that things will start to turn around for the better and soon. So very sad.

Early Childhood Education and Common Sense said...

Thanks Ger!

Melissa @ The Chocolate Muffin Tree said...

I feel when I look at those images from the news about Japan that they are not even real...it is difficult for my mind to comprehend what is even going on? I feel so sad for all the people who have to go through this and hope they come out of this stronger! My daughter has seen some of the images and it is even more difficult for her to comprehend. How will you explain this horrific event to the children that you teach?

Early Childhood Education and Common Sense said...

Hi Melissa,
I don't feel this will come up with my children.If someone hears about it out on the news or from parents, I think we will just acknowledge it. and follow the lead of the child. I wouldn't tend to bring it up.

I do think disasters and horrific images like this are frightening for small children, but all we can do is acknowledge, possibly talk about the facts, and offer comfort.I think because children sometimes imagine things to be even more terrible than they may be, and worry about the safety of their own homes, and especially their parents, I think we could offer reassurance that this particular disaster is factually happening far away, etc., and maybe even think of things as a family, we could do to help the people, such as in Japan, also focusing on the rescuers, and how many people from all over the world are coming to Japan's aid.This could be reassuring and put the child's mind at ease, as well focus on what we can do to help.

There is a women with a website who has a small project for those who want to take time to offer thoughts for the people suffering in Japan. It is called Considerthiswisdom.com (10 to 10). I'm sorry I don't have the link here. I heard about her on a CBC(public radio) talk show today, and briefly looked it up but it was under construction.

I hope this helps?

B

MullenAvenueWorkshop said...

Melissa,
I had another few thoughts. First please note I'm no expert, but as an educator, what about taking out the atlas, or globe, and do some research on Japan, or also take out some books at the library about earthquakes. Knowledge I think is always a good way to deal with anxiety - for anyone.

However also a person needs to be aware that although a child may view the images of a disaster on t.v., he or she may not want to talk about it, might not be ready to process it. These are just some of my thoughts.
Take care,
B

Melissa @ The Chocolate Muffin Tree said...

Thanks for all your input Brenda! My daughter loves maps and that would be a great way to show that it is far away. She always wants me to point where we live on a map. She is fascinated with weather and would actually like learning about why there are earthquakes and other natural disasters.

MullenAvenueWorkshop said...

Your welcome Melissa, hope it may help.
B